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Criminal Procedure: Investigation, Second Edition

Erwin Chemerinsky, Laurie L. Levenson

$194.00

  • ISBN: 9781454807131

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  • Description

    Written in the student-friendly style that characterizes Chemerinsky’s Constitutional Law casebook, Criminal Procedure: Investigation features cases, minor cases, and author-written essays while omitting both notes in the form of rhetorical questions and excerpts from law review articles. The chronological organization moves through the investigation process. Dynamic text guides students through understanding the law with tightly edited cases, samples of legal pleadings arguing the issues, and perspectives from prosecutors, defense, counsel, judges, police, and victims alike. Each chapter has a consistent, systematic approach, beginning with an introduction laying out the nature of the issue, followed by a discussion on the history and development of the law. Then, examples of recent and seminal cases reveal how key criminal procedure issues have been raised, and an analytic approach toward resolving each issue shows what worked and why. A detailed Teacher’s Manual provides questions—along with answers—to provoke class discussion, and instructors are provided with additional teaching materials such as PowerPoint slides and a DVD presenting the facts and backgrounds of key cases.

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  • Details
    Page Count 802
    Published 07/29/2013
  • Additional Product Details
    Summary of Contents Ch. 1. Introduction to Criminal Procedure Ch. 2. Searches and Seizures Ch. 3. The Exclusionary Rule Ch. 4. Police Interrogation and the Privilege against Self-Incrimination Ch. 5. Identification Procedures Ch. 6. Right to Counsel

  • Author Information

    Laurie L. Levenson

    Laurie Levenson is a Professor of Law, William M. Rains Fellow and Director of the Center for Ethical Advocacy at Loyola Law School in Los Angeles.

    While in law school, Laurie Levenson was chief articles editor of the UCLA Law Review. After graduation, she served as law clerk to the Honorable James Hunter III of the United States Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit. In 1981, she was appointed assistant United States Attorney, Criminal Section, in Los Angeles, where she was a trial and appellate lawyer for eight years and attained the position of senior trial attorney and assistant division chief. Levenson was a member of the adjunct faculty of Southwestern University Law School from 1982-89. She joined the Loyola faculty in 1989 and served as Loyola's associate dean for academic affairs from 1996-99.

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    Erwin Chemerinsky

    Erwin Chemerinsky is the founding Dean and Distinguished Professor of Law, and Raymond Pryke Professor of First Amendment Law, at the University of California, Irvine School of Law, with a joint appointment in Political Science. Professor Chemerinsky was a member of the Duke University Law School faculty from 2004 until 2008. He joined Duke after 21 years at the University of Southern California Law School, where he was the Sydney M. Irmas Professor of Public Interest Law, Legal Ethics, and Political Science. Before that he was a professor at DePaul College of Law from 1980-83. Practiced law as a trial attorney, United States Department of Justice, and at Dobrovir, Oakes & Gebhardt in Washington, D.C. Received a B.S. from Northwestern University and a J.D. from Harvard Law School.

    Publications: The author of several books and casebooks, including The Case Against the Supreme Court (Viking, 2014), The Conservative Assualt on the Constitution (Simon & Schuster, 2010), Federal Jurisdiction (Aspen 7th ed. 2016) (a one volume treatise on federal courts); Constitutional Law: Principles and Policies (Aspen 5th ed. 2015) (a one volume treatise on constitutional law); Constitutional Law (Aspen 5th ed. 2016) (a casebook); Interpreting the Constitution (Praeger 1987). Also, author of over 100 law review articles that have appeared in journals such as the Harvard Law Review, Michigan Law Review, Northwestern Law Review, University of Pennsylvania Law Review, Stanford Law Review and Yale Law Journal. Writes a regular column on the Supreme Court for California Lawyer, Los Angeles Daily Journal, and Trial Magazine, and is a frequent contributor to newspapers and other magazines. Regularly serves as a commentator on legal issues for national and local media.

    In April 2005, was named by Legal Affairs as one of the top 20 legal thinkers in America. Named by the Daily Journal every year from 1998-2003 as one of the 100 most influential lawyers in California. Awards include the 2003 President's Award from the Criminal Courts Bar Association; 2003 Freedom of Information Award form the Society for Professional Journalists; 2002 Community Service Award from the Western Center on Law and Poverty; 2001 Community Service Award from the Anti-Defamation League; 2001 Clarence Darrow Award from the People's College of Law; 2000 Alumni Achievement Award from Northwestern University; the 1999 Eason Monroe Courageous Advocate Award from the American Civil Liberties Union of Southern California; and the 1998 Judge John Brown Award for Contributions to Federal Judicial Education. Also received awards for work on the Los Angeles City Charter from the American Society of Public Administration, the Los Angeles Chamber of Commerce, and the Los Angeles Urban League.

    Frequently argues appellate cases, including in the United States Supreme Court and the United States Courts of Appeals. Most recently, argued Van Orden v. Perry (a challenge to a Texas Ten Commandments monument) and Tory v. Cochran (a First Amendment case concerning the permissibility of injunctive relief as a remedy in defamation cases) in the Supreme Court in March 2005, and Scheidler v. National Organization for Women (suit for injunction to stop violent protests of reproductive health care facilities) in November 2005. Testified many times before congressional and state legislative committees, including as a witness before the Senate Judiciary Committee on the hearings of Samuel Alito for confirmation to the Supreme Court in January 2006.

    Elected by the voters in April 1997 to serve a two-year term as a member of the Elected Los Angeles Charter Reform Commission. Served as Chair of the Commission, which proposed a new Charter for the City which was adopted by the voters in June 1999. Also served as a member of the Governor's Task Force on Diversity in 1999-2000. In September 2000, released a report on the Los Angeles Police Department and the Rampart Scandal, which was prepared at the request of the Los Angeles Police Protective League. Served as Chair of the Mayor's Blue Ribbon Commission on City Contracting, which issued its report in February 2005.

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